LP TX

Local Progress Texas Statement of Principles

We are a network of local elected officials united by our commitment to shared prosperity, equal justice under law, livable and sustainable communities, and good government that serves the public interest. Building a more just and equitable society requires an engaged public, strong institutions, and elected leaders who are dedicated to advancing the progressive movement. We commit ourselves to this work in partnership with community leaders and progressive organizations around the State.

 To strategically advance our vision of a genuinely progressive Texas, we dedicate ourselves to pursuing:  

  • A more equitable economy in which everyone has the freedom to thrive and no one lives in poverty. In an equitable economy, hard work translates into livable wages, safe and discrimination-free working conditions, paid sick leave, and the ability to organize on the job, and everyone has access to safe, affordable, and decent housing that is close to stores, restaurants, schools, parks, and jobs. This economy also includes universal access to healthcare, including reproductive healthcare.
  • A broadly-shared commitment to eliminating the effects of institutional and systemic racism in all aspects of life, including a fair and accountable criminal legal and policing systems, a real pathway for the formerly incarcerated to employment, voting laws and election maps that do not disproportionately and negatively impact communities of color and urban areas, and ending discriminatory zoning and redlining practices. This includes the economic development and infrastructure projects that preserve and protects our environment and do not  burden vulnerable communities. 
  • A school system that is adequately funded across the State and gives all children an excellent education regardless of socioeconomic status, race, sex, gender identity or expression, disability, status as an English language learner, or zip code. In addition to having strong academic and trade programs, public schools should be supportive environments where students learn social-emotional skills without  disciplinary policies that create a school-to-prison pipeline.
  • Full civil rights for all Texans regardless of race, gender, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or disability. This includes a commitment to full LGBTQ equality in all aspects of life, reproductive rights and sexual freedom for all, and a specific commitment to full inclusion and protection for all residents regardless of immigration status or religion.
  • Responsible governments that respect their diverse constituents, understand their needs, and believe in their promise. Responsible governments contain elected officials and employees that reflect the communities they represent, both in demographic representation and policy priorities. Local Progress Texas believes local leaders know what their communities need and must maintain local authority to protect their constituents from state interference designed to harm working people and communities of color.

Actualizing this vision will require both pragmatism and a willingness to dream. To achieve it, we must unite with community allies across our state. As leaders in our cities, towns, and counties, we are committed to organizing ourselves and our constituents in pursuit of a more just and equitable society and an ever-more progressive and united Texas.

Highlights:

  • Local Progress Texas (LPTX) is a partner in the Working Texans for Paid Sick Time coalition, which was successful in passing paid sick time in Austin, San Antonio, and Dallas.
  • Over a dozen LPTX members in jurisdictions across the state announced a joint effort to pursue living wages in their local budgets.
  • Austin became the first American city to pass a Freedom City resolution to protect immigrants and decrease mass incarceration of African American residents through limiting discretionary arrests.
  • In DeSoto, Texas, an LPTX member led the passage of paid parental leave for city employees. This was the first type of such legislation ever passed in North Texas.
  • LPTX welcomed 75 elected officials, community organizations, and labor union partners for its first state convening in April 2019. The convening featured a lobby day at the State Capitol to preserve local control against state interference, particularly to support working people and immigrant residents.
  • In 2019, LPTX was formally certified by the Local Progress board as the second Local Progress state chapter, after New York.

On the steps of the Capitol last Thursday, Casar introduced the new Texas chapter of Local Progress, a national network of local progressive elected officials. Leaders from around the state — including Dallas, Desoto, Balch Springs and San Marcos — showed up to affirm their right to govern.

TEXAS OBSERVER
April 10, 2019

It’s not surprising that the same sort of coalition of elected officials advancing the fight against SB4 have turned to this issue,” said Sarah Johnson, the director of Local Progress. “Workers and immigrants are important to the foundation of cities. The work being done around SB4 has created a strong coalition that has advanced from defense to offense.”

CITY LAB
February 21, 2018

Local Progress Texas Organizing Committee:

Alexsandra Annello, El Paso City Representative
Deb Armintor, Denton Councilmember
Greg Casar, Austin Council Member and Local Progress Board Member
Lauren Doherty, Allen Councilmember
Stacey Donald, Collin County Community College Board Trustee
Holly Maria Flynn Vilaseca, Houston ISD Trustee
Tartisha Hill, Balch Springs Mayor Pro Tempore
Dr. Jocabed Marquez, San Marcos Councilmember
Adam Medrano, Dallas Deputy Mayor Pro Tempore
Omar Narvaez, Dallas Councilmember
Candice Quarles, DeSoto Councilmember
Mark Rockeymoore, San Marcos Councilmember
Brian Rowland, Prairie View Councilmember
Anne Sung, Houston ISD Trustee
Candace Valenzuela, Carrollton/Farmers Branch ISD Trustee

To find out more about Local Progress Texas, contact Texas State Coordinator Mercedes Fulbright (mfulbright@populardemocracy.org).